Terms and Definations Used in Raising and Showing Boer Goats

  •  Broad  through the chest floor and wide spring or sprung – this kind of goat  will have the desirable barrel with the proper shape through the ribs. The      front legs will be set wide apart and not be flat at the breastbone. The rack should be wide and smooth with the ribs being round and the width should carry all the way back through the hips so that the Chest Floor isnot broader than the hips
  • Correct Bite – the bottom jaw aligns up with the top dental pad.
  • CORID Solution -  (Amprolium 9.6%) is used as an aid to prevent and treat coccidiosis caused by Eimeria bovis and E. zurnii in calves. Can be administered in drinking water or as a drench, CORID Solution is the strongest option for preventing coccidiosis.
  • Covexin 8  -  vaccination of healthy cattle and sheep as an aid in the prevention of diseases caused by Clostridium chauvoei, C. septicum, C. novyi Type B, C. haemolyticum (known also as C. novyi Type D), C. tetani and C. perfringens Types C and D.
  • Clostridial Diseases -  include black disease, blackleg, malignant oedema, tetanus and botulism. Clostridial spores are widespread in the environment, particularly in soil and organic material.
  •  Cydectin -    Cydectin Pour-On is used for the treatment of infections and infestations due to internal and external parasites in beef and dairy cattle. Zero slaughter withdrawal. Zero milk withholding. Cydectin Pour-On is used to aid in the control of: · gastrointestinal roundworms (brown stomach worms - 28 days of persistent activity) · lungworms (42 days of persistent activity) · cattle grubs · mites · 4 types of lice  
  • Decoquinate -  a coccidiostat. In vitro. Decoquinate is a feed additive intended for the control of coccidiosis, a debilitating protozoal infection in poultry. The active agent is 4-hydroxyquinoline, incorporated at 0.6 % by weight in the feed additive.
  • Diatomaceous Earth  -  fossilized remains of tiny, aquatic organisms called diatoms. Their skeletons are made of a natural substance called silica. Over a long period of time, diatoms accumulated in the sediment of rivers, streams, lakes, and oceans.
  • Ear  – is folded vertically from the top of the ear where it attaches to the head to the bottom, and all the way into the ear canal, in effect, nearly closing the ear. 
  • Fish Teat – A teat that has a small split at the tip and resembles a fish tail 
  • Goat Polio (Polioencephalomalacia)-  a metabolic disease with symptoms that often mimic or overlap those of the brain-stem disease Listeriosis (Listeria monocytogenes). In most cases, both of these diseases are seen in goats raised under intensive management conditions.
  • Hocks In – Cow Hocked – hocks closer together than feet, hocks bend in as viewed from the rear. Hocks turn in when the goat stands or walks. 
  • Ivomec Plus Injection -  a parasiticide used to treat and control internal and external parasites such as gastrointestinal roundworms, lungworms, grubs, sucking lice, and mange mites in cattle. It's also used to treat and control gastrointestinal roundworms, lungworms, lice, and mange mites in swine.
  • Lacks Volume/Depth/Capacity – is narrow and shallow bodied. Front legs are set close together, and the hips are usually short and steep. This animal lacks room to have a large     functioning rumen system, or lungs. 
  • Lethargy -  defined as a state of sluggishness, inactivity, and apathy. Other words are also associated with lethargy, such as listless, tiredness, lack of energy, continued sleepiness, and others.
  • Monensin -  used in the beef and dairy industries to prevent coccidiosis, increase the production of propionic acid and prevent bloat
  • Monkey Mouth or Mouth is Out – the front teeth do not align up with the bottom teeth. This can also be called an over shot mouth with means the bottom jaw extend out beyond the top jaw. 
  • Neck – The juncture of the neck and shoulder should be free of excess tissue. It should gently slope to indicate muscling. Smoothness and quality are important in this area. A long clean neck with enough muscling to be in balance to the remainder of the animal is desired. A long thin neck without adequate muscling that is not in proportion to the rest of the body is not desirable. The standard changes between bucks and does with the desirable neck in a buck having heavier muscling than the neck in a doe. 
  •  Panacur - Fenbendazole - (Hoechst brand names Panacur and Safe-Guard, Intervet Panacur and Panacur Rabbit) is a broad spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic used against gastrointestinal parasites including: giardia, roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, the Taenia genus of tapeworms (but not effective against Dipylidium caninum, a common dog tapeworm), pinworms, aelurostrongylus, paragonimiasis, strongyles and strongyloides and can be administered to sheep, cattle, horses, fish, dogs, cats, rabbits and seals. Drug interactions may occur if salicylanilides like dibromsalan and niclosamide are co-administered. Abortions in cattle and death in sheep have been reported.
  • Parrot  Mouth – the bottom jaw is shorter than the top jaw, so that the top jaw overlaps the bottom jaw which causes an incorrect bite. 
  • Posty Leg – The leg is straight up and down and not bent at all in the hock when the goat is standing naturally. Either knock knees or posty hocks may      make it difficult for goats to walk long distance
  • Pneumonia - Lung inflammation caused by bacterial or viral infection, in which the air sacs fill with pus and may become solid. Inflammation may affect both lungs (double pneumonia), one lung (single pneumonia), or only certain lobes (lobar pneumonia).
  • SafeGuard -  Fenbendazole (Hoechst brand names Panacur and Safe-Guard, Intervet Panacur and Panacur Rabbit) is a broad spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic used against gastrointestinal parasites including: giardia, roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, the Taenia genus of tapeworms (but not effective against Dipylidium caninum, a common dog tapeworm), pinworms, aelurostrongylus, paragonimiasis, strongyles and strongyloides and can be administered to sheep, cattle, horses, fish, dogs, cats, rabbits and seals. Drug interactions may occur if salicylanilides like dibromsalan and niclosamide are co-administered. Abortions in cattle and death in sheep have been reported.  
  • Smooth  over the Shoulder and through the Front End – being wide and flat at the rack. The shoulder should tie in nicely to the neck, ribs, and brisket. 
  • Shoulders – The goat’s muscling should increase from the withers to the point of  the shoulder with the thickest muscle occurring immediately above the chest floor. The circumference of the forearm is the second most important indicator of meatiness, so the forearm muscle should exhibit a prominent bulge and should tie in deep into the knee. 
  • Smooth  over the Rack – feels smooth over the withers and ribs. 
  • Slab Sided or Lacks Spring of Rib – flat ribbed or narrow bodied – these animals lack volume/depth/capacity. 
  • Tracks wide from the Front/Rear – walks straight and wide in the front and the rear. 
  • Short  through the Hip or Rump – lacking adequate distance between the hooks      and pins. This is the overall length of the rump. 
  • Steep Rumped – too much angle between the hook and pin bones. Looks like a ski slope down from the top of the hips to the tail. 
  • Short  through the Loin – loin (between the 12th rib & hook bones) is too short for the size length of the goat. Generally the back “half” of the goat (last rib to tail head) should be longer than the front half (fron of chest to last rib). 
  • Split Teat – where two teats are so close together that they actually come out of the body on one base, and split at the end of the teat. The length of the split and presence or absence of the milk channel are determining      factors whether the teats meet breed standards. 
  • Valbazen - Broad-Spectrum Dewormer Oral Suspension for Use in Cattle, Sheep, and Goats for removal and control of liver flukes, tapeworms, stomach worms (including 4th stage inhibited larvae of Ostertagia ostertagi), intestinal worms, and lungworms in cattle and sheep and for the treatment of adult liver flukes in nonlactating goats
  • Weak/Down in the pasterns – pasterns are weak and give when the goat walks or stands. A goat that may walk on his/her dewclaws is considered severe.    Splays out in the front – front feet turn out when the goat stands or  walks. 

This is an on going list and changes all the time.

I have been trying to add definations and descriptions that is useful.  I am not going to tell everything here, but just start to try to lead in the right directions.  If you find, have, or hear of any items that you think will be helpful, please pass it on.