What animals called Boer Goat

      What are these animals called Boer goat? This is a good question and I did not know years ago. They are originally from South Africa and were breed from indigenous goats in that area.  The earliest that I have been able to find that they were brought to western Uganda by the Black Nations in or around AD 1200. We know that these were not the “Boer Goats’ but was the building blocks of the Boer Goat. The boer goats were developed in South Africa by breeding these ‘indigenous’ stock. Researcher have had little luck pinning down the exact line of decent for the modern boer. The Boer goat was probably bred by the Namaqua Bushmen and the Fooku .They are a fast growing animal that produces a high quality meat that is called 'chevron' , 'carito' or simply 'goat meat'. They are very large framed, double muscled and fast growing animals.  They have a very high fertility rate which is great in the met area and commonly have twins and even up to quad births. They have the ability to survive in various conditions in South Africa.  They were originally bred for meat and hardiness in the 20th century in South Africa. This started by ranchers in the Eastern Cape Providece of South Africa. Mr T.B. Jordaan (Late) of Buffelsfontein, Somerset East. He bublished the first journal for the African Boer Goat Breeders’ Association in 1959. There was a purchase o;f goats bt Mr. W.G.Jordan , the father of T.B. Jordan, from Mrs. Van de Venter of Somerset East The goats were short haired with red heads. He also purchased a dappled buck from Mr. I.B. van Heerden of Kaalpass, Crodock. From these goats the earliest breeding stock of the Boer Goats started. The regulation of the breeding standards were started own July 4th 1959 by the forming of the Boer Goat Breeder’s Association (of South Africa) For the following years standards that was started by this association helped guide and develop the “Boer” goat.  In 1977 Boer goats were imported to Germany. Then in 1987 they were imported into New Zealand by the Lancopr Corporation Ltd. And then imported to Australia in 1988. You can look at this as the final jump before the Boer Goat came to the United States. In New Zealand, three main parties were involved in the importing of South African Boer Goats were Lancorp CorporationLtd., Embroytech Corporation, and Africian Goat Flock Co.      

Boer goats are commonly white bodies and brown head, but that is not the only coloration. They have long and pendulous ears. There is a wide range that has been accepted in the United States.  They are very friendly and easily to domesticate.  They male animal is called a buck and the female is called a doe.  If you make a buck non-fertile by mean of castration this animal then is called a whether.  A full grown buck can be anywhere from 240 to 300 lbs. and mature doe 200 to 220 lbs.  Due to selective breeding and well manage feed program the weight has increase and I have seen bucks as large as 350 + lbs. and does 250 +.     This goat was bred to help in clearing land that was too difficult for humans to clear and were able to do this is a very productive way.  The name Boer means "Farmer". They are not normally a grassing animal.  Their diet generally consist of leaves, branches and woody plants and some grasses.      This meat is in high demand in the United States and some of the figures that I have seen say that anywhere from 1.5 million pounds to 3 million pounds are imported into the United States WEEKLY.  The world as a whole eats around 63% of their red meat comes from goats.Raising Boer Goats:     It is not as easy as some think.  They do not eat cans and trash items they have a highly complex digestive system.  They have only been the United State sense the 90's and are still adapting to the area and there is not a great amount of individual (Vets) that know or even see these animals.  I just wanted to add this information because I have been asked many time they are just goats and all you have to do is find a fence that can hold them and let them be.  This is far far from the truth.      I do have links and even examples of things I do with my goats on this web page.  Feel free to look at my idea and understand that I am not a veterinarian.  Again, we are not Veterinarians and don't claim to be or try to be.  A lot of these items have been collected from many website and they are all not mine.  Remember that if you do not do anything then the goat will not make it. There are good Veterinarians for farm animals and they need to be used when you're not comfortable dealing with your animals and follow their instructions on medications and treatments. We do not recommend the following or say this is the way to deal with them; this is just what we have learned and what works for us. We have had many things that we would go back and do different, but this is a list of things that we have used over and over again.  This list will continue to grow at our farm and even things will leave. We in no way suggest these treatments will work for your goats. There are a lot of treatments and things to do, but remember the Veterinarian is the professional.  This is an ongoing description of this animals and my interpretation will be added as I am able. 

What is a Boer Goat and What are Some Facts About Boer Goats

Boer GOAT Classification

American Purebred Does and Bucks  

This can be a wide range of genetic combinations.This would mean that somewhere in their genetic(documented) history and animal that was not a 100% has been bred with it. The ability to become an AFB you must meet one of the following  

  • Doe between 93.7% to 99.9%
  • Does that are AFB can produce off springs that can be registered as AFB
  • Does between 93.7% and 99.9% can show in FullBlooded classes in the ABGA
  • Bucks between 96.8% and 99.9% are AFB
  • Bucks that are AFB can produce offspring that can be registered AFB
  • Bucks between 96.8% and 99.9% can show in FullBlooded Classes in the ABGA

 Link: http://abga.org/about-abga/rules-regulations/ 

 

Fullblood Does and Bucks

 This is an animal that was imported to the United States around 1990's.  They were brought here to be used in the growth of the meat goat industry.  To be at the level of a FULLBLOOD / 100% you must be able to track the animals genetic back to South Africa.  This animal is or is able to be registry like the ABGA Fullblooded Registry which make this animal qualify for points through sanctioned show program and able to be a part of the Ennobled Point System. Once an introduction of an animal that is not 100% there is no way to get above 99.9% in the way of reguistration.  Full Blooded is lost forever. 


Link: http://abga.org/about-abga/rules-regulations/ 


What are BOER GOATS


Facts:

Age at first breeding: 6 months 

Number of kids born / number of does kidded: 154 Number of kids weaned per number of does kidded: 120 

 

100-day weaning weight buck kids: 59 lbs +/_(27 kg) 

100-day weaning weight doe kids: 52.0 lbs+/- (24 kg)

Mature weight does:17 lbs +/- (80 kg.) 

 

Products 

• Meat – Tender tasty meat at a young age. Healthy, low fat meat. 

• Excellent quality skin (value-added trait) • Good quality white cashmere, although in small quantities (value-added trait) 

• The Boer goat is being used very effectively in South Africa in combination with cattle due to its browsing ability and limited impact on the grass cover. 

 

 Normal production environment 

• Coastal bush veld to mixed sweet and sour bush veld. 

• Adapts well to both extensive bush veld and intensive pasture systems. 

  

Breed numbers 

There are currently 270 Boer goat breeders who are members of the breeders’ society. There are about 60 000 Boer goats registered with the Boer Goat Breeders’ Society in South Africa. The total number of Boer goats in South Africa is unknown. 

 

 



American Purebred Does and Bucks

 This can and is a wide range of % and combinations of genetic history that can be in this class.  Usually the Boer goat blood line has been added to another breed to increase an attribute that was missing from the original breed. This could be anything from color to loin length.  The percentage class applies to the following  

  • Does between 50%  and 93.6% can be registered
  • Percentage does are able to produce register able does
  • Does that are 50% to 93.6% can show in the percentage class in the ABGA
  • Bucks 50% to 96.7% are eligible for record of pedigree
  • Bucks that ar 50% to 96.7% cannot produce a register able offspring
  • Bucks that are 50% to 96.7% cannot show in a sanctioned show in the ABGA but can be wethered and showed in FFA, 4-H and market show. These are animals that are usually ment to be used in the market/meat area due to the removal of their reproduction equipment. NOTE: This removal kept the meat taste at a different level that males that are intacked​ 

Link:  http://abga.org/about-abga/rules-regulations/   

HOW TO UNDERSTAND TYPES OF WORMERS IN BRIEF AND QUICK GLANE

  • Whites get intestinal type of worms of parasites.  An example would be Tapeworms and Pin worms. These are Safeguard, Valbazen, Equimax horse paste and Zimectrin Gold horse paste. (Valbazen in this group should not be used in pregnant animals because it can cause the animals to abort pregnancy)
  • Clear de wormers go after blood sucking worms and parasites. An example would be Barber Pole worms. Cydectin, Ivermectin, Quest Gel horse paste & Prohibit are in this group. Prohibit is the powerful and needs precise dosing or od symptoms can be quite bad. 

*** I wouldn't just get one schedule and use one wormers until it stops working.  I would also use the type of wormer that you need to kill the wormers that are present. I would always run a fecal test to know what worm or parasite you're after. This will also be effective in getting rid of the root cause of the problem that is present in your herd. YOU MUST REMEMBER: wormers are poison. You need to use the correct dosage and the right drug!! I give all these orally, because goats metabolize things quickly.  I have been told that if you inject it, a lot burns off fast in the blood stream. If you give it orally it goes into the digestive system where the parasites/worms are living. 

Disclaimer

We are not Veterinarians and don't claim to be or trying to be. There is good Veterinarians for farm animals and they need to be used when your not comfortable dealing with your animals and follow there instructions on medications and treatments. We do not recommend the following or say this is the way to deal with them; this is just what we have learned and what works for us. We in no way suggest these treatments will work for your goats. There are a lot of treatments and things to do, but remember the Veterinarian is the professional.

Breed Standards Faults & DQ Charts Per ABGA for Show Goats

 

UNITED STATES BOER GOAT STANDARDS (ABGA)

American Boer Goat Association Breed Standards

     GENERAL INTRODUCTION    These standards have been put forth to assist you as a breeder to improve your herd. Please take time to review the breed standards and look at the pictures also located on the ABGA website so that you will have a better understanding of how these standards can help you improve your breeding program and goals.     

 I. CONFORMATION    Any extreme occurrence of a fault is a disqualification.     

 BODY    Body should be boldly three-dimensional: long, deep and wide. Does should possess a wedge shape that is deeper at the rear flank than the heart girth, indicating the body capacity to carry multiple kids while also maintaining adequate rumen function. The heart girth should provide ample respiratory capacity and should not appear pinched when viewed from the side or top. Ribs should be well-sprung. The loin should be well muscled, wide and long. The top line should be level throughout with an abundance of muscle from the shoulder through the hip. Animals should exhibit adequate body conditioning relative to stage of production, but not be extremely thin or show accumulation of excessive fat deposits.    Faults: Swayback; a break or excessive dip in the topline behind the shoulders; inadequate muscle through the back and loin; pinched heart girth; poor body condition; chest too narrow, too shallow or too wide such that it causes the point of the elbow to be separated from the body; excessive fat deposits.      

NECK AND FOREQUARTERS    The neck should be of moderate length and in proportion to body length. Does should exhibit a feminine neck while bucks should have a heavily muscled neck displaying masculinity. The neck should blend smoothly into the shoulder, withers and brisket. Shoulders should be fleshy, proportional to the body and smoothly blended and fitted into the withers without excessive looseness or protrusion of the shoulder blades above the withers. Withers should be broad, well-rounded, and not sharp. Forequarters should be well fleshed with muscling extending into the forearm and without excessive fat accumulation at the brisket or behind the   shoulder. Bucks should display masculinity and heavier muscling through the forequarters than does. The chest should be deep and broad with chest floor that is proportional to the size of the animal.    Faults: Neck too short or too thin; excessive movement or looseness in the shoulder blades resulting in shoulders that are weakly attached;; excessive fat deposits at the brisket or behind the shoulder; lack of muscling.      

HEAD    A Boer goat should have a prominent strong head with brown eyes and a gentle appearance. Nose should have a gentle curve, wide nostrils, and a well-formed mouth with well-opposed jaws. Bucks should possess a strong, masculine head while does should maintain a feminine appearance about the head.    The forehead should be prominent and form an even curve linking the nose and horns. Horns should be dark, round, strong, of moderate length, positioned well apart and have a gradual backward curve before turning outward symmetrically. The horns should be well spaced from the back of the neck to allow full range of motion without rubbing the neck at maturity. Ears should be smooth and pendulous with no folds at the base of the ear, and with sufficient length to lay smoothly against the head without interfering with the eye. Ears that are curled or folded upward at the tip are not discriminated against.    Incisor teeth must touch the front of the upper dental pad until the goat is 24 months of age. After 24 months, incisor teeth may not protrude more than ¼ of an inch beyond the upper dental pad. A bite and jaw that fits correctly is preferred. Teeth should erupt in the proper sequential position. Deciduous (baby) teeth that have been shed prior to the eruption of permanent teeth, or those that have not yet been shed before the corresponding permanent tooth is fully in place, are not to be discriminated against.    Faults: Dished or concave forehead/face; bulging or wild eyes; entropic (inverted) eyelid; flat, straight or wild type horns; horns positioned too close together; horns that grow too closely to the head or neck; erect or airplane ears in Fullblood animals; jaw too pointed; shallow lower jaw; twisted, crooked, or overlapping permanent teeth.    Disqualifications: Wry or twisted face; cleft palate; blue eyes; ear folded lengthwise; ear crimped or narrowed at the base; shortened lower jaw (parrot mouth); incisor teeth not touching the front of the upper dental pad before 24 months; incisor teeth protruding more than ¼ of an inch beyond the upper dental pad after 24 months; teeth not erupted in proper sequence or position; more than 8 incisors, when additional teeth are not the result of the normal shedding process of the deciduous teeth.    

HINDQUARTERS    The rump should be broad and long with a gentle slope between the hip and pin bones and clearly defined muscling. The base of the tail must be centered and straight. The remainder of the tail may curve upward or to one side. The area of the rear legs between the pin bones and down through the inner thighs should be well muscled, deep, full and firm, with the rear udder attachment area in does as high and wide as possible. Both inner and outer thighs should be deep, wide and muscular, with ample muscling extending beyond the stifle and toward the hock.    Faults: Rump too steep; rump too level, so as to contribute to difficult delivery of kids in the doe; lack of muscling; excessive fat deposits.    Disqualification: Wry tail.    

  FEET AND LEGS    The legs should be strong, well placed and in proportion with the depth of the body. The limbs should be well jointed and smoothly blended, allowing for ease of movement and soundness over a long productive life. The front legs should be straight, with the point of the shoulder, knee, fetlock joint, pastern and hoof forming a plumb line when viewed from the front. The rear leg should form a plumb line from hip bone through the hock, cannon bone, fetlock and dew claw when viewed from the side or the rear. Pasterns should be strong and of medium length. Hooves should be well formed, as dark as possible, and point directly forward when viewed from the front of the animal.    Faults: Any structural leg, muscle, bone, joint, or hoof deformities or abnormalities, including: knock knees; buck knees; calf knees; bandy legs; sickle hocks; cow hocks; post legs; pasterns too short, too long, too straight or too weak; hooves pointing outward or inward; splayed toes.    Disqualifications: Any foot or leg fault that adversely affects an animal’s gait or causes lameness; pasterns so weak as to cause the dew claws to touch the ground at any time at rest or in motion.      

II. SKIN AND COVERING    The skin should be loose and supple, with short glossy hair preferred. Mature bucks should have a pleated appearance to the skin on the front of the neck. A limited amount of winter down or under-coat will be acceptable during the winter months, especially in colder environments.

 For Fullblood bucks and does: hairless areas under the tail should be at least 75% pigmented; 100% preferred. For Percentage does, Hairless areas under tail should be at least 50% pigmented; 100% is ideal. Any color of pigmentation is acceptable other than pink or white, including rose-color or light tan.    Faults: Hair too long or too coarse.    Disqualification: Fullbloods with less than 75% pigmentation on hairless areas. Percentages with less than 50% pigmentation on hairless areas.     

 III. REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS    Any extreme occurrence of a fault is a disqualification.      

DOES  Does should have a well formed udder with good fore and rear attachment, such that the udder is well supported throughout the productive life of the doe, with the floor of the udder at or above the level of the hocks. It is most important that the udder is constructed so that the offspring are able to nurse unassisted.    Preferred teat structures consist of either one or two, well-separated, functional teats on each half of the udder. One additional, smaller, non-functional teat (teat without an orifice) located further toward the doe’s stomach is not desirable but is not discriminated against.    Acceptable teat structures have no more than two functional teats per side and include: one or more non-functional teats; no more than one split teat with two distinctly separate teats and orifices, when at least 50% of the body of the teat is separated; a teat containing two milk channels with a smooth or rounded end and with no sign of a dimple or division between the orifices; no more than one additional, non-functional teat or protrusion attached to the main teat, as long as it does not interfere with or prevent nursing.    Please refer to the Source: http://abga.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/American-Boer-Goat-Association-Breed-Standards-01-01-2017.pdf    

AUSTRALIAN BREED STANDARDS

Boer Goat Australia (is using the breed standards of the South African Boer Goat Breeders Association)

Genetics:

Fullblood registration in this category is only open to goats that are of Standard Fullblood Boer Genetics.  Disallowed: Goats with Kalahari/Savannah/Australian Red genetics in their bloodlines. 

Head:

A strong broad head with large soft brown almond shaped hooded eyes. A strong curved Roman nose with wide nostrils, the tip of the nose to be in line with the lower lip and chin. A strong curved lower jaw rising to meet the upper jaw. Up to 6 tooth must show a 100% fit and at 8 tooth and older may show a 6mm. protrusion, permanent teeth must be cut in the correct anatomical position. A prominently curved forehead, linking up with the curve of the nose and horns. Horns should be strong, round, solid and show good colour, be of moderate length and placed moderately apart with a gradual backward sloping curve. Ears should be broad, smooth and of good length,hanging downwards from the head and set in line with the eye. 

Characteristic faults:

Concave forehead, straight, flat or wild upright horns, pointed jaw, ears folded lengthwise, stiff protruding ears or excessively short ears, overshot or undershot jaw. 

Neck & Forequarters:

A neck of moderate length in proportion to the length of the body, full and well fleshed and well joined to the forequarter is essential.  The breastbone should be broad with a deep broad brisket. The shoulder should be fleshy, in proportion to the body and be well fitted to the withers, the withers to be broad and not sharp. In Does, the neck should come out and deep from the chest, blending smoothly with the shoulders, be wide in its attachment and rising gracefully to the throat latch, showing refinement in the female. In Bucks, the neck should be thicker and show skin folds as a sign of masculinity. The chest should be broad with a deep brisket. The shoulder should be well muscled in proportion to the body, and be well fitted to the wither. 

Characteristic faults:

Very long, thin or short necks in proportion to the body or shoulders too loose.  Barrel. The barrel should be long, broad and deep. The ribs must be well sprung and fleshed, the loins well muscled, the goat should have a broad fairly straight back and must not be pinched behind the shoulders, a small dip behind the shoulder is acceptable. 

Characteristic faults:

Concave back, slab sided, cylindrical or pinched behind the should.

Hindquarters:

Well muscled through the rump, twist and inner thighs with length through the stitch, particularly in bucks. The rump should be broad, long and slightly sloped. The Tail must be straight where is grows out from the dock and then may swing to either side. 

Characteristic faults:

Narrow hips, rump that slopes too much or too short from hip to pin, poor muscling particularly in the bucks, short stitch / poor inner thigh development, and a wry tail.

Legs:

Emphasis should be placed on the legs which should be strong and well placed, be of medium length and in proportion to the depth of the body. Strong legs imply hardiness and a strong constitution, which is an absolutely essential characteristic of the Boer Goat. The upper leg should be long in proportion to the cannon bone and well muscled, with strong well formed pasterns and coloured hooves. Leg bone should be wide, flat and dry. 

Characteristic faults:

Knock knees, bandy legs, cow or sickle hocks, post legged, thin or fleshy legs, weak pasterns and hooves pointed outwards or inwards, or lacking good pigmentation colour.

Skin & Covering:

A loose supple skin with sufficient chest and neck skin folds, especially in the case of a buck. Eyelids and hairless parts must be pigmented. All hairless skin (i.e. under the tail, around the mouth and eyelids) should have a minimum pigmentation of 75%. Pigmentation may range from light through to dark. Hair should be short, dense and glossy, a limited amount of cashmere will be tolerated with a winter coat. 

Characteristic faults:

Hair too long, coarse or sparse, fine and open. Pigmentation less than 75%. 

Sexual Organs – Does:

Well formed udder firmly attached with no more than 2 separate teats on either side. 

Characteristic faults:

Any teat variation of more than 2 separate teats per side. calabash/bottle teats or pendulous udder. 

Sexual Organs – Bucks:

Two reasonably large, well formed, healthy and of equal size testes in one scrotum. A scrotum with no larger split than 5cm is permissible. The scrotum must be at least 25 cm. at maturity. 

Characteristic faults:

Small testes, a scrotum sac with a circumference of less than 25 cm at maturity. Bunched, calabash or split teats.

Size:

The ideal is a medium sized, heavy goat with maximum meat production. A desirable ratio between length of leg and depth of body should be achieved at all ages. Kids tend to be longer in the leg. 

Characteristic faults:

Goats that are too large or too small.

Colouring:

The ideal Standard Boer goat is a white goat with a fully pigmented red head and ears, with either a white blaze or with full red colouring. Uniform shading between light and dark is permissible. The minimum requirement for a stud animal is a red patch of at least 10 cm. in diameter on both sides of the head, ears excluded. Both ears should have at least 75% red colouring and with 75% pigmentation.

The following is permissible:
Head, neck and forequarters

a complete red colouring is permissible not further than the shoulder blade and on the shoulder not lower than level with the chest junction.

Barrel, hindquarters and belly

only one patch is permissible not exceeding 10 cm.

Legs

the term ‘legs’ is taken to mean that portion below an imaginary line formed by the chest and the underline, patch or a number of patches that do not exceed a total area of 5 cm. in diameter.

Tail

the tail may be red, but the red colour cannot continue onto the body for more than 2.5 cm.

Red hair and covering

very few red hairs in the white of the coat are permissible from the age of 2 tooth.

General Appearance:

The Boer Goat is an animal of quality showing balance and symmetry and a strong vigorous appearance. a goat with a fine head, round horns that bend backwards, a loose supple skin with folds, especially in the Bucks and with body parts well fleshed and in perfect balance.. The Doe must be feminine, the body wedging slightly to the front, which is said to be a sign of fertility. The Buck must demonstrate masculinity and strength and is heavier in the head, neck, forequarters and rump. The South African Boer Goat is an animal with symmetry, with a strong, vigorous appearance and fine quality, above all the Doe must be feminine and the Buck masculine.

Fertility:

A Doe must have kidded or be joined by the age of 2 years. 

Disqualifications:

Animals that display any of the following characteristics should not be used for breeding and may not be exhibited. Blue Eyes, Wry, twisted or crooked face or mouth (i.e. parrot mouth)  Undescended, single or divided testes, monorchid or cryptorchid

IMPORTANT NOTE:

WHERE AN ANIMAL IS HIGHLY EXCEPTIONAL IN ITS FUNCTIONAL TRAITS AND DISPLAYS AN AESTHETIC FAULT, ITS EXCEPTIONAL TRAITS SHOULD BE RECOGNISED.      

NEW ZEALAND STANDARDS

New Zealand Boer Goat Association Breed Standards

2004 BOER GOAT BREED STANDARD The following are the breed standards accepted by the New Zealand Boer Goat Association.  This standard is a guide to breeders and sets down guidelines to encourage the breeding of an  improved boer goat with increased economic value to commercial goat meat production.  When evaluating boer goats, productive traits such as conformation, mobility and good structure  should always receive priority over other aesthetic traits. To this end form should always follow function.   

Head A strong, broad head showing character and a quiet disposition. Large brown almond shaped hooded eyes. A strong curved roman nose with flared and wide nostrils with the tip of the nose in line with the lower lip and chin.  A strong lower jaw rising to meet the upper jaw is ideal. Up to 6 tooth must show a 100% fit and at 8 tooth may show 6mm protrusion. Permanent teeth must cut in the correct anatomical place  A prominently curved forehead linking up with the curve of the nose and horns. Horns should be strong, round, solid and show colour, be of moderate length and placed moderately apart with a gradual backward curve. Ears should be long, broad, smooth, set in line with the eye and hang downwards from the head Characteristic faults. Concave forehead, straight, flat or wild horns, pointed jaws, ears folded [lengthwise], stiff protruding ears, short ears. overshot or undershot jaw. 

Neck and Forequarters A neck of moderate length in proportion to the length of the body. In does, the neck should come out from the chest blending smoothly with the shoulders, be wide in it's attachment and rising gracefully to the throatlatch which shows refinement in the female.  In males, the neck should be thicker and show skin folds as a sign of masculinity, The chest should be broad with a deep brisket, The shoulder should be well muscled, in proportion to the body and be well fitted to the wither. The wither should be broad and well-fitted [not sharp]. Characteristic faults. Very long, thin, or short neck or too loose shoulders. 

Barrel The barrel should be long, broad and deep. The ribs must be well sprung and the loins well-muscled. The goat should have a broad, fairly straight back and must not be pinched behind the shoulders. A small dip behind the shoulder is acceptable. Characteristic faults. Concave back, slab-sided, cylindrical or pinched behind the shoulder.   

Hindquarters The pelvis must be large, broad and deep with good length from the hip to pin. Well-muscled through the rump, twist and inner thighs with length through the stitch, particularly in bucks. The rump should be slightly sloped. The tail should be straight at the dock and be able to move freely. Characteristic faults Narrow hips or thurl, rump that slopes to much, wry tail, short from hip to pin, poor muscling particularly in males, short stitch / poor inner thigh development.   

Sexual organs Does: Well-formed udder firmly attached with no more than two separate teats on a side.  

Bucks: Two reasonably large, well-formed, healthy and equal sized testes in one scrotum. A scrotum with no larger split than 5cm is permissible. The scrotum must be at least 25cm in circumference at maturity. Characteristics faults Any teat variation of more than two separate teats per side, calabash/bottle teats or pendulous udder. Small testes; a scrotum with more than a 5cm split; scrotal sack with a circumference of less than 25cm at maturity.   

Size The ideal is a medium sized, heavy goat with maximum meat production. A desirable relationship between length of leg and depth of body should be achieved. Kids tend to be longer in the leg. Characteristics faults Goats too large or too small [ pony type].  

Colouring The Boer Goat is a white goat with a fully pigmented red head and white blaze. A full red head is permissible.  Uniform shading between light and dark is permissible. The minimum requirement for a stud animal is a red patch of at least 10cm in diameter on both sides of the head, ears excluded. Both ears should have at least 75% red colouring and 75% pigmentation. The following is permissible: · Head, Neck and Forequarters:    A total red colouring is permissible not further than the shoulder blade and on the shoulder not lower than the chest junction.  Barrel, Hindquarters and Belly:   Only one patch not exceeding 10cm in diameter is permissible.  

Legs:   The term 'legs' is taken to mean that portion below an imaginary line formed by the chest and the underline. One patch or a number of patches that do not exceed a total area of 5cm in diameter.  

Tail:   The tail may be red, but the red color may not continue onto the body for more than 2.5cm.  

Red Hair and Covering:   Very few red hairs in the white of the coat is permissible from the age of two tooth.   

General appearance and type The ennobled Boer Goat is an animal of quality with balance and symmetry and a strong, vigorous appearance. The doe must be feminine, wedging slightly in the front. The buck demonstrates masculinity, and is heavier in the head, neck, forequarters and rump.   Fertility A doe must have kidded by 2 years of age.   

Disqualifications Animals that display any of the following disqualifications should not be used for breeding and may not be exhibited:  - Blue eyes.  - Wry, twisted or crooked face or mouth.  - Parrot mouth.  - Undescended, single or divided testes, monorchid or cryptorchid.   

Provision Where the animal is highly exceptional in its functional traits and displays an aesthetic fault its exceptional traits should be recognized.  

Source: https://www.nzbgba.co.nz/breedstandards 

Term & Definations that might help in Raising Goats

This is a list that is on going. If you have any suggestion of words and information that needs to be added please send you suggestions to us.